Egyptian Arabic (اللغة المصرية العامية) Bible - New Testament

Egyptian Arabic (اللغة المصرية العامية) Bible - New Testament

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Egyptian Arabic (اللغة المصرية العامية) Bible - New Testament

Egyptian Arabic (Egyptian Arabic: عربى مصرى‎), locally known as Colloquial Egyptian (العامية المصرية) or simply Masri (مَصرى, Egyptian) is the spoken vernacular Arabic dialect of Egypt.Egyptian is a North African dialect of the Arabic language which is a Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family. It originated in the Nile Delta in Lower Egypt around the capital Cairo. Egyptian Arabic evolved from the Quranic Arabic which was brought to Egypt during the seventh-century AD Muslim conquest that aimed to spread the Islamic faith among the Egyptians. Egyptian Arabic is mainly influenced by the Egyptian Coptic language and its grammar structure which was the native language of the vast majority of Nile Valley Egyptians prior to the Islamic conquest, and later it had small influences by European and foreign languages such as French, Italian, Greek,Turkish, and English. The 94 million Egyptians speak a continuum of dialects, among which Cairene is the most prominent. It is also understood across most of the Arabic-speaking countries due to the predominance of Egyptian influence on the region as well as Egyptian media including Egyptian cinema which has had a big influence in the MENA region for more than a century along with the Egyptian music industry, making it the most widely spoken and by far the most widely studied variety.While it is essentially a spoken language, it is encountered in written form in novels, plays, and poems (vernacular literature), as well as in comics, advertising, some newspapers, and transcriptions of popular songs. In most other written media and in television news reporting, Literary Arabic is used. Literary Arabic is a standardized language based on the language of the Quran, that is, Classical Arabic. The Egyptian vernacular is almost universally written in the Arabic alphabet for local consumption, although it is commonly transcribed into Latin letters or in the International Phonetic Alphabet in linguistics text and textbooks aimed at teaching non-native learners. Also, it is sometimes written ad-hoc in ASCII Latin alphabet mainly online and in SMSs.